Associate in Fine Arts with Art Emphasis

Associate in Fine Arts with Art Emphasis at Harper College

Study design or fine arts at a four-year university 

Transfer majors  Art icon


  • Design
  • Digital Arts/Media
  • Fine Arts
  • Studio Art

Get an Associate in Fine Arts degree and transfer to a four-year institution after completing a program in design or studio arts. Take a selection of core classes along with fine arts-focused courses in areas such as drawing, digital art, design, art history and more. Studio courses will give you hands-on experience in drawing, design, printmaking, digital art, digital photography, painting and ceramics/sculpture.

Art careers include: Animator, ceramic artist, college professor, fabricator, film/video-maker, furniture-maker, jewelry artist, painter, photographer, print-maker, prop/display production, and sculptor.

Design careers include: Animator, college professor, fashion designer, film/video-maker, game designer, graphic designer, illustrator, industrial designer, interior designer, landscape designer, photographer, and web designer.

Harper College offers numerous opportunities for students to exhibit works, learn from visiting artists, and participate in juried exhibitions. You may participate in student organizations including Point of View (a literary and art magazine), the Harper College Clay Guild, the Graphic Design Club and more.

This program is a convenient and affordable way to begin your college education. Academic advisors will help you choose courses that meet the specific requirements of the four-year college or university you plan to attend.

Certificate program requirements

These requirements apply to the Associate in Fine Arts-Art Emphasis degree.

These requirements apply to students who first enrolled for Fall 2018. Students who first enrolled prior to Fall 2018 should obtain the appropriate sheet of requirements from a Student Development Center.

Completion of the Associate in Fine Arts-Art degree does not fulfill the requirements of the Illinois General Education core curriculum. After transfer, Associate in Fine Arts-Art students will need to complete the general education requirements of the institution to which they transfer.

Communications

3 courses

A grade of C or better is required for ENG 101 and 102.

9

Number Course Title Credits
ENG 101 3

Description: Emphasizes the writing of expository prose. Introduction to the critical reading of nonfiction prose. IAI C1 900

Prerequisite: ENG 100 with a grade of C or better. Other placement options. ENG_Placement_Grid.pdf ESL students need one of the following options: ESL 073 and ESL 074 with grades of B or better; ESL 073 and ESL 086 with grades of B or better; ESL 073 and ESL 099 with grades of B or better; ESL 073 with required writing placement test score; or ESL 074 with required reading placement test score.

ENG 102 3

Description: Continues ENG 101. Reading literature and writing of various types of prose. Introduces methods used in writing investigative papers. IAI C1 901R

Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor or department chair.

SPE 101 3

Description: Theory and practice of oral communications. Development of poise, confidence and skill in speech organization and delivery. Emphasis on frequent speaking, development of standards of criticism and selection and organization of material. IAI C2 900

Mathematics

1 course

3

Number Course Title Credits
MTH 101 4

Description: Develops conceptual understanding, problem-solving, decision-making and analytic skills dealing with quantities and their magnitudes and interrelationships, using calculators and personal computers as tools. Includes: computing statistical measures such as central tendency and dispersion; computing correlation coefficients and regression equations; using normal distributions to test hypotheses; using logical statements and arguments in a real-world context; solving systems of equations and inequalities and modeling data; solving mathematical finance problems; and selecting and using appropriate approaches and tools in formulating and solving real-world problems. IAI M1 901

Prerequisite: MTH 080 (Intermediate Algebra) with a grade of C or better or other placement options. MTH 065 (Algebraic Modeling) with a grade of C or better is an acceptable prerequisite if MTH 081 is taken concurrently with MTH 101. Math_Placement_Grid.pdf

MTH 124 3

Description: Develops the mathematics of simple models in behavioral, social and management sciences. Studies applications of set theory, vectors and matrices, linear programming, probability rules, and Markov chains with computer assistance. IAI M1 906

Prerequisite: MTH 103 (College Algebra) with a grade of C or better or other placement options. Math_Placement_Grid.pdf

MTH 131 4

Description: Completes the two course sequence that begins with MTH 130 and focuses on mathematical reasoning and the solving of real-life problems, rather than on routine skills. The following topics will be studied in depth: geometry, counting techniques and probability, logic and statistics. Students are expected to be active participants in the learning process. Calculators and computers will be used throughout the course. A weekly lab component is required. IAI M1 903

Prerequisite: MTH 130 (Mathematics for Elementary Teaching I) with a grade of C or better.

MTH 134 or

Description: Develops an intuitive approach to concepts of differential and integral calculus. Applies these concepts to problems in social, behavioral and management sciences. Not for physical science or mathematics majors. IAI M1 900-B

Prerequisite: MTH 103 (College Algebra) with a grade of C or better, or other placement options. Math_Placement_Grid.pdf

MTH 200 4-5

Description: Studies limits, continuity, derivatives, antiderivatives, and definite integrals as they relate to algebraic, trigonometric, inverse trigonometric, logarithmic and exponential functions. Includes applications to geometry, science, and engineering. IAI M1 900-1, IAI MTH 901

Prerequisite: MTH 140 (Precalculus) with a grade of C or better, or other placement options. Math_Placement_Grid_17_18.pdf

MTH 165 or

Description: Focuses on mathematical reasoning and the solving of real-life problems in statistics, rather than on routine skills. Includes analysis of data using sample statistics, basic probability theory, probability distributions (normal and binomial), sampling distributions of means and proportions, statistical inference (estimation, hypothesis testing, t-test and chi-square test, and errors), correlation and regression, F-test and analysis of variance. Computer labs using statistical software packages are incorporated throughout course. (Credit will be given for either MTH 162 or MTH 165 or MGT 225, but not all.) IAI M1 902

Prerequisite: MTH 080 (Intermediate Algebra) with a grade of C or better, or other placement options. MTH 065 (Algebraic Modeling) with a grade of C or better is an acceptable prerequisite if MTH 085 (Supplemental Math/Elementary Statistics) is taken concurrently with MTH 165. Math_Placement_Grid.pdf

MTH 225 4

Description: Focuses on the use of statistical concepts as decision-making tools with an emphasis on business-related applications. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability theory, and inferential methods including chi-square tests, regression analysis, and ANOVA. This course is strongly recommended for business majors. You may not receive credit for more than one of MTH 225 OR MTH 165 OR MTH 162 OR MGT 225. (IAI M1 902/IAI BUS 901)

Prerequisite: MTH 103 (College Algebra) with a grade of C or better, or other placement options (including meeting the Geometry requirement). Math_Placement_Grid.pdf

MTH 201 5

Description: Continues MTH 200. Uses integrals to describe area and volume, studies techniques of integration, series, conics, polar coordinates and parametric equations with applications to science and engineering. IAI M1 900-2, IAI MTH 902

Prerequisite: MTH 200 (Calculus I) with a grade of C or better, or other placement options. Math_Placement_Grid.pdf

MTH 202 5

Description: Continues MTH 201. Studies three-dimensional vectors, solid analytic geometry, vector-valued functions, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, Green’s theorem, surface integrals, divergence theorem and Stoke’s theorem. IAI M1 900-3, IAI MTH 903

Prerequisite: MTH 201 (Calculus II) with a grade of C or better, or other placement options. Math_Placement_Grid.pdf

MTH 220 3

Description: Introduces analysis of finite collections and mathematical foundations of sequential machines, computer system design, data structures and algorithms. Includes sets and logic, subscripts, arrays, number systems, counting, recursion, graph theory, trees, networks and Boolean algebra. IAI M1 905, IAI CS 915

Prerequisite: MTH 103 (College Algebra) with a grade of C or better, or other placement options. Math_Placement_Grid.pdf

Physical and Life Sciences

2 courses with 1 course from the Life Sciences and 1 from the Physical Sciences. 1 course must be a lab science (marked with an *).

7

Number Course Title Credits
Life Sciences:
BIO 101 3

Description: Surveys the science of biology, emphasizing the human organism. Includes chemical and physical properties, physiological systems of control, growth, differentiation, reproduction, genetics, ecology, evolution and ethical considerations. Also includes a broader overview of the plant and animal kingdoms and humans’ place in, and interactions with, those kingdoms. (NOTE: Not Lab science credit.) IAI L1 900

BIO 103 3

Description: Surveys and analyzes man's role as an environmental modifier. Ecological, social cultural, economic and political influences on environment are considered. The historical and current pollution problems and other environmental disruptions are analyzed and evaluated. Possible remedial courses of action are discussed and evaluated.(NOTE: Not Lab science credit.) IAI L1 905

BIO 104 * 4

Description: Investigates the interrelationship between humans and the environment through scientific inquiry. Lecture and laboratory topics include the scientific method, ecosystems, biodiversity, energy sources, natural resources, conservation, pollution, and population dynamics. Incorporates chemical and physical aspects as applicable to relevant biological concepts. Examines human’s ecological, social and cultural impacts on our environment and possible solutions. Laboratory experiences involve some outside field work and field trips. Intended for non-science majors. (NOTE: Lab science credit.) IAI L1 905L

BIO 105 3

Description: Examines life and the evolutionary record with emphasis on human genetics and inheritance. Factors such as current applications of biotechnology and its ethical, political and social implications in the 21st century are considered. (NOTE: Not Lab science credit.) IAI L1 906

BIO 110 * 4

Description: Surveys the science of biology through scientific inquiry, emphasizing its impacts on humans and society. Includes chemical and physical properties, physiological systems of control, growth, differentiation, reproduction, genetics, ecology, and evolution with ethical and societal considerations. Provides a broad overview of the plant and animal kingdoms as well as the interactions with these organisms and humans, especially from a societal perspective. (NOTE: Lab Science credit) IAI L1 900L

BIO 115 * 4

Description: Introduces fundamental processes of organisms operating at the molecular and the cellular level of organization. Topics include chemical and molecular aspects of life, cellular metabolism, genetic information flow, theory of inheritance, genetic engineering and principles of physiology. This is the first course of a two-course series. (NOTE: Lab science credit.) IAI L1 910L, IAI BIO 910

Prerequisite: MTH 080 (Intermediate Algebra) or higher with a grade of C or better, or required MTH 103 (College Algebra) placement test score AND placement into ENG 101. Math_Placement_Grid.pdf ENG_Placement_Grid.pdf

BIO 116 * 4

Description: Introduces students to higher levels of biological organization from the organism to the ecosystem. Topics include organismal diversity, mechanisms of micro and macroevolution, animal behavior, and the dynamics and organization of populations, communities and ecosystems. (NOTE: Lab science credit.) IAI L1 910L, IAI BIO 910

Prerequisite: BIO 115 (Fundamentals of Cellular Biology) with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor.

BIO 120 * 4

Description: Emphasizes scientific inquiry through selected concepts in biology, such as organization, function, cellular and molecular biology, heredity, diversity, evolution and ecology using plants as the type of organism. Topics include plant structure, diversity, growth, genetics, evolution, physiology and reproduction. Economic, cultural, environmental and medical relationships between plants and humans are emphasized. (NOTE: Lab Science credit.) IAI L1 901L

BIO 140 * 4

Description: Emphasizes scientific inquiry through selected concepts in animal biology. Surveys the animal kingdom based on theory of organic evolution, including morphology, histology, physiology, taxonomy, parasitology, embryology and ecology. Economic, environmental and medical relationships between animals and humans are emphasized. (NOTE: Lab Science credit.) IAI L1 902L

Physical Sciences:
AST 100 3

Description: Introduces the main concepts of contemporary astronomy using a scientific approach. Topics include the scientific method, the celestial sphere, celestial motions, gravity, light, telescopes, the Solar System, stars, the interstellar medium, galaxies, and cosmology. Current research in the different areas will be discussed. Knowledge of high school algebra is assumed. For science and non-science majors. IAI P1 906

AST 101 * 4

Description: Introduces the various topics of astronomy using a scientific approach. Covers the origin of the universe, structure and composition of galaxies, properties and life cycle of stars, the solar system, historical astronomy, constellations, meteors, and comets. Knowledge of high school algebra is assumed. IAI P1 906L

AST 112 * 4

Description: Introduces the main concepts of solar system astronomy. Topics include the fundamentals of astronomy, planetary motion, the Earth, the Moon, terrestrial planets, Jovian planets, small bodies in the solar system, the Sun, the formation of the solar system, other planetary systems, and the possibility of extraterrestrial life. Current research in the different areas will be discussed. Knowledge of high school algebra is assumed. For science and non-science majors. IAI P1 906L

AST 115 * 4

Description: Introduces the main concepts of stellar, galactic, and extra-galactic astronomy. Topics include life cycles of stars, supernovae, black holes, interstellar medium, structure of the Milky Way galaxy, galaxy classification, galaxy interactions, dark matter, dark energy and the Big Bang model. Current research in the different areas will be discussed. Knowledge of high school algebra is assumed. For science and non-science majors. IAI P1 906L

CHM 100 * 4

Description: Introduces basic concepts of inorganic and organic chemistry and biochemistry. Emphasizes chemical principles applied to biological systems. Laboratory exercises apply theory to biological and consumer products. Especially designed for students in allied health sciences. Meets the prerequisite of the Nursing program. IAI P1 902L

CHM 103 * 4

Description: Introduces chemical principles to illustrate the significance of chemistry in the world today. Practical applications and current issues related to general chemistry, organic chemistry and biochemical topics will be integrated with chemical concepts. Recommended for non-science majors. IAI P1 903L

CHM 105 * 4

Description: Relates biological and physical systems to chemistry. Focuses on four major themes: the sociology of science, chemical composition and change, the chemistry of life, chemistry and society. Corresponding laboratory is inquiry based. Designed to provide a higher level of scientific literacy to non-science majors and to provide elementary education majors, in particular, with the content knowledge and disposition about science that is necessary in order to be able to teach science in engaging and meaningful ways to their students. Aligned with State of Illinois teacher preparation standards. IAI P1 903L

Prerequisite: MTH 080 or higher (or required math placement exam score) with a grade of C or better, or concurrent enrollment. Math_Placement_Grid.pdf

CHM 110 * 4

Description: Introduces concepts of chemistry. Emphasizes the composition of matter, the periodic table, the chemistry of solutions and chemical calculations. The laboratory experiments utilize many common household materials to demonstrate applications of chemical concepts. For students whose preparation does not permit enrollment in CHM 121. IAI P1 902L

Prerequisite: MTH 080 or higher with a grade of C or better or other placement options, or concurrent enrollment. Math_Placement_Grid.pdf

CHM 121 * 5

Description: Studies principles of atomic and molecular structure, bonding, stoichiometry, states of matter, kinetic molecular theory, and solutions. Corresponding laboratory experiments include volumetric and gravimetric analyses, a qualitative study of reactions, visible spectrophotometry, and problem-based analyses. Intended for all students whose majors require general chemistry, including science majors and pre-professionals. The course also satisfies a general education laboratory science requirement for students with previous chemistry experience. IAI P1 902L, IAI CHM 911

Prerequisite: (Two semesters of high school chemistry or CHM 110 with a grade of C or better) AND (MTH 080 or higher with a grade of C or better, or placement options into MTH 103). Math_Placement_Grid.pdf

ESC 100 3

Description: Provides a survey of earth materials, their origins, chemistry, structure, identification, classification and uses, with an emphasis on minerals and rocks used in everyday life, and their impact on health and the environment. Knowledge of high school algebra is assumed. This course is intended for both science and non-science majors. IAI P1 907

ESC 101 3

Description: Designed to give the non-science major an understanding and appreciation of basic concepts in geology, atmospheric science and astronomy. IAI P9 900

Prerequisite: MTH 080 (Intermediate Algebra) with a grade of C or better, or other placement options into MTH 101 (Quantitative Literacy). Math_Placement_Grid.pdf

ESC 110 * 4

Description: Examines topics in geology: including rocks, minerals, plate tectonics, and geologic time; meteorology: including atmospheric science, severe weather, and atmospheric dynamics; astronomy: including the origins of modern astronomy, introduction to planetary science, and cosmology. (formerly PHS 112) IAI P1 905L

Prerequisite: MTH 080 (Intermediate Algebra) with a grade of C or better, or other placement options into MTH 101 (Quantitative Literacy). Math_Placement_Grid.pdf

ESC 111 * 4

Description: Provides an introduction to the earth’s minerals, rocks and natural resources and the processes which have shaped the Earth’s surface such as sedimentation, mountain building, and action of water, wind, ice and downslope movements. Covers Earth’s fundamental structure and the behavior of Earth materials. Focuses on the roles of volcanism, earthquakes, sea-floor spreading and paleomagnetism in explaining plate tectonic theory. Knowledge of high school algebra is assumed. This course is intended for both science and non-science majors. (formerly GEO 101) IAI P1 907L

ESC 112 * 4

Description: Includes basic principles of historical geology, rocks and minerals, plate tectonics, geologic time, reading the fossil record, the evolution of Earth through time, evolution of life through time, and the geologic story of the North American continent. Knowledge of high school algebra is assumed. This course is intended for both science and non-science majors. formerly GEO 102) IAI P1 907L

ESC 113 * 4

Description: Examines the relationships between humans and the geological environment. Includes the study of use and abuse of natural resources such as water, minerals, and energy, an overview of natural hazards, an examination of urban geology and land management issues and the relationship between community status and land use, an analysis of pollution and waste disposal, and an introduction to climate change and global warming. Emphasis is on issues and practices in the Chicagoland area. Knowledge of high school algebra is assumed. This course is intended for both science and non-science majors.(formerly GEO 103) IAI P1 908L

ESC 121 * 4

Description: Gives the non-science major an understanding and appreciation of the composition and structure of the atmosphere, thermodynamic processes, forces and related small- and large-scale motions, air masses, fronts, tropical cyclones, solar and terrestrial radiation, severe weather, basic weather forecasting techniques, and general circulations that affect the atmosphere. Knowledge of high-school algebra is assumed. (formerly PHS 115) IAI P1 905L

Prerequisite: MTH 080 (Intermediate Algebra) with a grade of C or better, or other placement options into MTH 101 (Quantitative Literacy). Math_Placement_Grid.pdf

GEG 111 3

Description: Examines the spatial distribution of elements of Earth’s four physical spheres: the atmosphere, the hydrosphere, the lithosphere, and the biosphere including landforms, climates, weather, vegetation, and soils. Consideration is given to the causes of these distributions and to their effects on human populations. IAI P1 909

GEG 112 * 1

Description: Applies the scientific method of observation, hypothesis formation, and experimentation to Earth’s four physical spheres: the atmosphere, the hydrosphere, the lithosphere, and the biosphere. IAI P1 909L

Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in GEG 111.

PHS 170 * 3

Description: Studies the field of nanotechnology, the capability to observe and manipulate systems at the molecular or atomic scale that is affecting all traditional sciences. Provides an introduction to the history, tools, materials, and current and emerging applications of nanotechnology. IAI P9 900L

Prerequisite: MTH 080 or higher with a grade of C or better, or placement into MTH 103. Math_Placement_Grid.pdf

PHY 100 3

Description: Examines basic topics in physics including motion, force, energy, electricity and magnetism, waves and particles, and atomic structure. Course is for non-science majors fulfilling non-laboratory science requirements. IAI P1 900

Prerequisite: MTH 080 with a grade of C or better, or placement into MTH 101 (Quantitative Literacy). Math_Placement_Grid.pdf

PHY 110 * 4

Description: Examines topics from physics including motion, structure of matter, electricity and magnetism, waves and particles and atomic structure. This course is intended for non-science majors fulfilling laboratory science requirements. IAI P1 900L

Prerequisite: MTH 080 (Intermediate Algebra) with a grade of C or better, or placement into MTH 101 (Quantitative Literacy). Math_Placement_Grid.pdf

PHY 112 * 4

Description: Introduces non-science majors to topics from various sciences as they relate to energy resources and energy consumption. Connects the theory of energy to its practical applications. Examines the connection between science and economics, politics and other social issues, using energy as a focus. Meets laboratory science requirements for non-science majors. (formerly PHS 105) IAI P1 901L

Prerequisite: MTH 080 (Intermediate Algebra) with a grade of C or better, or placement into MTH 101 (Quantitative Literacy). Math_Placement_Grid.pdf

PHY 121 * 5

Description: Covers mechanics, heat, fluids, and sound. Intended for students in life science, architecture and technology. Students pursuing degrees in engineering, physics, or chemistry should enroll in PHY 201. Knowledge of high school trigonometry assumed. IAI P1 900L

Prerequisite: MTH 140 with a grade of C of better,or other math placement options into MTH 200. Math_Placement_Grid.pdf

PHY 201 * 5

Description: Introduces mechanics using calculus. Topics include force and motion; work and energy; rotation; oscillations; and fluids. For students in chemistry, engineering, mathematics and physics. IAI P2 900L, IAI PHY 911

Prerequisite: MTH 200 with a grade of C or better. Recommend concurrent enrollment in MTH 201.

Humanities

2 courses

Courses marked with a + meet the World Cultures and Diversity graduation requirement. One 3 credit-hour course is required for graduation.

6

Number Course Title Credits
CHN 202 4

Description: Further develops communicative skills and knowledge of the Chinese language and culture. Uses a communicative approach to engage students in the activities to practice listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. This course is the second of a two-semester sequence of the second-year Mandarin Chinese program. IAI H1 900

Prerequisite: CHN 201 or equivalent

FRN 202 4

Description: Provides a crucial bridge between intermediate and advanced language courses. Focuses on a more in-depth study of history, geography, literature, and culture of French-speaking people. Includes analysis of daily life and current events. Students practice more complex structures of French grammar, fine-tune pronunciation, gain more advanced skills in composition, and continue to expand their vocabulary. Attention is given to complexity, accuracy and fluency. All new students who have prior experience with or have taken classes in French should consult with the department for placement before registering for a course. Instructions can be found on the World Languages website. IAI HI 900

Prerequisite: FRN 201 with a grade of C or better, or required placement exam scores.

FRN 210 + 3

Description: Provides an introduction to literature from the French-speaking world and exposes students to a variety of literary genres and eras. Focuses on the development of more complex use of the language and addresses speaking, listening, writing, and reading. Attention is given to complexity, accuracy, and fluency. All new students who have prior experience with of have taken classes in French should consult with the department for placement before registering for a course. Instructions can be found on the World Languages website. IAI H3 917

Prerequisite: FRN 202 with a grade of C or better, or required placement exam scores.

GER 202 4

Description: Provides a crucial bridge between intermediate and advanced language courses. Focuses on a more in-depth study of history, geography, literature, and culture of German-speaking people. Includes analysis of daily life and current events. Students practice more complex structures of German grammar, fine-tune pronunciation, gain more advanced skills in composition, and continue to expand their vocabulary. Attention is given to complexity, accuracy, and fluency. All new students who have prior experience with or have taken classes in German should consult with the department for placement before registering for a course. Instructions can be found on the World Languages website. IAI H1 900

Prerequisite: GER 201 with a grade of C or better, or required placement exam scores.

GER 210 + 3

Description: Provides an introduction to literature from the German-speaking world and exposes students to a variety of literary genres and eras. Focuses on the development of more complex use of the language and addresses speaking, listening, writing, and reading. Attention is given to complexity, accuracy, and fluency. All new students who have prior experience with of have taken classes in German should consult with the department for placement before registering for a course. Instructions can be found on the World Languages website. IAI H3 917

Prerequisite: GER 202 with a grade of C or better, or required placement exam scores.

HST 105 or

Description: Introduces students to a selection of formative historical and contemporary texts in a variety of disciplines, including philosophy, the social sciences, literature, gender/multicultural studies, and the history of science. (Also listed as HUM 105. Credit will be given for either HST 105 or HUM 105, but not both.) IAI H9 900

HUM 105 3

Description: Introduces students to a selection of formative historical and contemporary texts in a variety of disciplines, including philosophy, the social sciences, literature, gender/multicultural studies and the history of science.(Also listed as HST 105. Credit will be given for either HUM 105 or HST 105, but not both.) IAI H9 900

HUM 101 3

Description: Explores architecture, art, history, literature, music, philosophy and the theatre of the Western tradition from Prehistory through the Medieval era. May include a special focus; consult the course schedule for specific topics. NOTE: HUM 101 and HUM 102 need not be taken in sequence. IAI HF 902

HUM 102 3

Description: Explores architecture, art, history, literature, music, philosophy, and the theatre of the Western world from the Renaissance to the present. May include a special focus; consult the course schedule. IAI HF 903

HUM 104 + 3

Description: Examines the cultural structures and the literary, visual, and performing arts of the various societies of the Middle East. Examines and compares the great contributions these cultures have made in the various arts as living artifacts to both the present day Middle East and to other cultures including those of the West. IAI HF 904N

HUM 106 + 3

Description: Examines the arts of Asian cultures from ancient times to the present. Studies examples of the visual arts, music, dance, literature, world views, and religious traditions from selected civilizations in Asia, south of Russia, excluding the countries of the Middle East. IAI HF 904N

HUM 107 + 3

Description: Examines the arts of African cultures from ancient times to the present. Studies examples of the visual arts, music, dance, literature, world views, and religious traditions from selected civilizations in North Africa, the Sahel, South Africa, Central and East Africa, and West Africa, excluding countries associated with the Middle East. IAI HF 904N

HUM 110 + 3

Description: Explores the nature of female creativeness, focusing on women in the traditionally male arenas of art and literature and on areas in which the female creative impulse manifests itself under other names such as the shaping of social attitudes, domestic arts and religious experiences. IAI HF 907D

HUM 120 3

Description: Studies the myths of Greece and Rome. Focuses on the stories of gods and heroes in classical literature and art. Considers the influence of classical mythology on later Western culture. IAI H9 901

HUM 125 + 3

Description: Studies world mythic themes and patterns, excluding those of Greece and Rome. Focuses on archetypal figures/situations, symbolism, and figurative language found in creation stories, heroic legends and/or other traditional narratives. May include a special focus; consult the schedule. IAI H9 901

JPN 202 4

Description: Continues JPN 201. Accuracy and ease in more complex conversation; advanced study of reading and writing. Study of more complex syntax and composition. IAI H1 900

Prerequisite: JPN 201 (Intermediate Japanese I) with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor.

LIT 105 3

Description: Facilitates the understanding, appreciation and enjoyment of poetry. Presents poetry of American, European and other literary philosophies and movements. Challenges students to develop skills in responding personally to poetry and in developing literary analyses. Reveals the link between the whole poem and particular literary qualities such as imagery, figurative language, allusion, connotation, and the music of poetry--sound and rhythm. Offers a forum for exchanging ideas about poetry in guided conversation and writing. IAI H3 903

LIT 110 3

Description: Presents a survey of drama from various countries and eras. The course will include representative selections from such modes as tragedy, comedy, melodrama, romance, satire and social commentary as well as absurdist drama. The selections could include such authors as Ibsen, Miller, Moliere and Shakespeare, among others.(See THE 111 [Introduction to the Theatre] for theatrical study of drama.) IAI H3 902

LIT 112 3

Description: Introduces methods of reading, interpreting and analyzing literary works as well as examining methods used in translating those works to the medium of film. Presents the short story, novel and the drama in conjunction with their cinematic counterparts. Relates the development of film to such schools as German expressionism, film verity, etc. Focuses on analysis of each form both on its own and in relation to the others through reading, viewing and writing. IAI HF 908

LIT 115 3

Description: Presents short stories and novels of high interest level. The selections typify authors and styles representative of major American and European literary movements and philosophies. Challenges the student to develop skills in literary analysis. Students will study characterization, narration, dialogue, plot and various other techniques of fiction. Individual sections may concentrate on particular periods, authors or topics. IAI H3 901

LIT 206 3

Description: Presents selected works of universal significance contributed by people and civilizations from ancient times to 1800. IAI H3 906

LIT 207 3

Description: Continues LIT 206. Selected works of universal significance contributed by people and civilizations from 1800 to the present. IAI H3 907

LIT 208 + 3

Description: Studies selected works from non-western civilizations, such as Africa, China, India, Japan and the Middle East. Fiction, poetry and drama will be included. IAI H3 908N

LIT 210 3

Description: Introduces Shakespeare's acting company, theater and audience. Discusses his techniques in building scenes, developing characters, handling dialogue. Readings and interpretations will consist of representative comedies, tragedies, histories, and problem plays. IAI H3 905

LIT 220 + 3

Description: Surveys English-language translations of Japanese poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. Reviews Noh and Kabuki drama and selections from Japanese cinema. Works will be studied in the context of Japanese history, but each work will be studied also as the product of its author's creative self-expression. No speaking or reading knowledge of Japanese is required; no background knowledge of Japan is required. IAI H3 909

LIT 221 3

Description: Presents American literature as an expression of American life through early social and political documents, novels, short stories and poems. IAI H3 914

LIT 222 3

Description: Explores American prose, drama, and poetry, Civil War to present, including minority literature, regional literature, literary journalism, criticism, and social and historical novels in their historical, social and cultural context to reflect current controversies and social changes. IAI H3 915

LIT 223 + 3

Description: Investigates what it means to be a minority in the United States. Examines the ways in which minority writers, through fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama, question the quality of American life and the authenticity of American democracy, thus helping students appreciate more fully the range of American cultures and subcultures. May include such writers as Olaudah Equiano, Frederick Douglass, Amiri Baraka, Rudolfo Anaya, Leslie Marmon Silko, Toni Morrison, Rita Dove, Leslea Newman, Li-Young Lee, Vassar Miller, Vivienne Finch. IAI H3 910D

LIT 224 + 3

Description: Examines the evolving portrayal of women--the many images, impressions and stereotypes in literature. Includes literature written about women and by women. Selections reflect a diversity of cultures, eras, authors and genres. The student will read selections from such authors as Bronte, Chekhov, Chopin, Hardy, Morrison and Woolf. IAI H3 911D

LIT 231 3

Description: Surveys English writers from beginning English literature to 1800. Reading and interpretation of writers such as Boswell, Chaucer, Congreve, Donne, Dryden, Johnson, Jonson, Malory, Milton, Pope and Swift. IAI H3 912

LIT 232 3

Description: Survey of English writers from Romantic Period to World War I. Reading and interpretation of writers such as Austen, Browning, Byron, Conrad, Dickens, Hardy, Keats, Shaw, Tennyson and Wordsworth. IAI H3 913

PHI 101 3

Description: Introduces the student to reasoning in a language-centered context. Students will learn how to identify arguments and distinguish them from other types of discourse. Some topics covered include evaluating claims, recognizing informal fallacies, problem solving and evaluating media. Students will also learn how to cast issues in a neutral manner, to recognize and appreciate a variety of perspectives, and to argue for and against more than one perspective on an issue. The focus of this course is on everyday practical reasoning. IAI H4 906

PHI 105 3

Description: Principles and problems of philosophy as seen in different schools of thought. Topics: validity of human knowledge; nature of reality; mind and body; free will and determinism; moral and aesthetic values; and religious belief. IAI H4 900

PHI 115 3

Description: Consideration of problems of value and conduct, including the question of the "good life" or happiness; and contemporary moral issues such as war, violence, drugs, racism, crime and punishment. IAI H4 904

PHI 160 + 3

Description: Introduces selected philosophical concepts and value systems of several non-Western cultures. Gives attention to the Bhagavad Gita, Vedanta and other Hindu texts, Confucius, the Tao Te Ching and other Chinese classics and key texts from at least two other traditions. IAI H4 903N

PHI 205 + 3

Description: Introduces the teachings, practices, social structures and histories of the religions of India (mainly Buddhism and Hinduism), and China and Japan (mainly Confucianism, Shinto and Taoism), and of the Middle East (mainly Christianity, Islam and Judaism). IAI H5 904N

PHI 215 + 3

Description: Surveys the contribution of religion to American culture including the differences between rural and urban society, the development of religious freedom and the rise of a "secular religion." Examines the emergence of new forms of belief and practice and the variety of religious issues confronting American society today. IAI H5 905

PHI 220 3

Description: Examines the nature and presuppositions of Western religions, especially the reasons which can be given for and against the existence of God. Selected further topics: the problem of evil, life after death, the nature of religious experience, language, knowledge and authority, religion and science, and major philosophical theories on the nature of religion. IAI H4 905

PHI 225 3

Description: Offers an overview of the New Testament and selected Early Christian writings. Introduces students to various methods of critical study, analysis, interpretation and application of these writings. IAI H5 901

PHI 231 3

Description: Surveys the major figures and schools in Western philosophical tradition from the pre-Socratic Greeks through the 14th century. Emphasis on interpreting philosophical reflection in light of the social, political, religious and cultural context from which it arises. IAI H4 901

PHI 232 3

Description: Surveys the major figures and schools in Western philosophical tradition from the 15th to the 20th century. Emphasizes interpreting philosophical reflection in light of the social, political, religious and cultural context from which it arises. IAI H4 902

SGN 202 3

Description: Reviews American Sign Language grammatical structures and lexical items presented in SGN 201. Focuses on conversational practice to develop expressive and receptive facility with the language. Includes culturally significant topics and interaction with members of the deaf community. H1 900

Prerequisite: SGN 201 (American Sign Language III) with a grade of C or better, or consent of department chair.

SGN 210 + 4

Description: Examines the history of American Sign Language, the emergence of the deaf community as a linguistic and cultural group, the cultural norms, values, traditions and rules of social behavior of the deaf community, minority dynamics and cross cultural interactions. No knowledge of American Sign Language is required for this course; it is taught in ASL with an interpreter. IAI H1 900

SPA 202 4

Description: Provides a crucial bridge between intermediate and advanced language courses. Focuses on a more in-depth study of history, geography, literature, and culture of Spanish-speaking people. Includes analysis of daily life and current events. Students practice more complex structures of Spanish grammar, fine-tune pronunciation, gain more advanced skills in composition, and continue to expand their vocabulary. Attention is given to complexity, accuracy, and fluency. All new students who have prior experience with or have taken classes in Spanish should consult with the department for placement before registering for a course. Instructions can be found on the World Languages website. IAI H1 900

Prerequisite: SPA 201 with a grade of C or better, or required placement exam scores.

SPA 210 + 3

Description: Provides an introduction to literature from the Spanish-speaking world and exposes students to a variety of literary genres and eras. Focuses on the development of more complex use of the language and addresses speaking, listening, writing, and reading. Attention is given to complexity, accuracy, and fluency. All new students who have prior experience with of have taken classes in Spanish should consult with the department for placement before registering for a course. Instructions can be found on the World Languages website. IAI H3 917

Prerequisite: SPA 202 with a grade of C or better, or required placement exam scores.

THE 121 + 3

Description: Examines how cultural perspective and minority expression shape theatre in the United States by exploring the roots of change in traditional theatre and the role of community in the formation of theatre companies. Specific focus will be given to African American theatre, Asian American theatre, Latino theatre, Native American theatre, feminist theatre, gay and lesbian theatre, political theatre, performance art and post-modernism as well as international trends. IAI F1 909D

Social and Behavioral Sciences

2 courses with courses selected from at least two departments.

Courses marked with a + meet the World Cultures and Diversity graduation requirement. One 3 credit-hour course is required for graduation.

6

Number Course Title Credits
ANT 101 + 3

Description: Addresses such central questions as “What does it mean to be human?” and “How did we get to be the way we are?” Among the topics to be examined will be human, physical, and cultural evolution; the origin of culture; language; religion; kinship; economics; and the impact of contemporary life on the world’s populations. IAI S1 900N

ANT 202 + 3

Description: Describes and analyzes how people throughout the world define and resolve the problems of life that are found everywhere. Some of the specific topics studied will be religion, social structure, law, “the unknown,” economics and the formation of behavior within particular groups. IAI S1 901N

ANT 205 3

Description: Studies the origins and evolution of humans as physical and cultural beings. Includes origin, history, and behavior of primates; fossil records; and the principles of population genetics and their application to study of human variation. IAI S1 902

ANT 206 + 3

Description: Surveys archeological concepts, research, and methods for the study of prehistoric cultures. Includes rise and development of modern civilization, land and land use, agriculture, current archeological investigations, interpretations of finds and introduction to field work techniques. IAI S1 903

ECO 200 3

Description: Covers descriptive rather than a quantitative approach to the study of economics. Major topics cover economic history, the elements of macroeconomics, microeconomics and a comparative look at other economic systems. Specifically designed for students in career-vocational curricula. IAI S3 900

ECO 211 3

Description: Covers economic problems faced by the individual and the firm. Examination of market structures, price and output determination. The microeconomic approach. IAI S3 902

ECO 212 3

Description: Covers economic problems faced by our society. Examination of resource allocation, national income and economic development, from a macroeconomic approach. IAI S3 901

GEG 100 + 3

Description: Surveys the contemporary topics of human geography; population, migration, language, religion, ethnicity, and political, economic and urban geography. Teaches the methods and tools geographers use in their science and practice. IAI S4 900N

GEG 101 + 3

Description: Surveys the major world regions emphasizing their physical, cultural, economic and historical geographies; provides a geographic interpretation of major current events. IAI S4 900N

GEG 103 + 3

Description: Surveys the technologically less developed regions of the World, including East Asia, South Asia, Middle and South America, Southwest Asia and North Africa, and Sub-Saharan Africa. Emphasis is placed on the spatial arrangement of resources, population, human institutions, economic activities, political patterns, religion, and cultural and physical landscapes. Each cultural realm is analyzed in respect to the larger international community with special attention to current events and issues. IAI S4 902N

GEG 104 + 3

Description: Surveys the technologically more developed regions of the world, including Europe, the United States and Canada, the former Soviet Union, Japan, Australia and New Zealand. Emphasis is placed on the spatial arrangement of resources, population, human institutions, economic activities, political patterns, religion, and cultural and physical landscapes. Each cultural realm is analyzed in respect to the larger international community with special attention given to current events and issues. IAI S4 901

GEG 150 3

Description: Provides an introduction to geospatial technologies, such as Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Global Positioning Systems (GPS), and Remote Sensing through hands-on computer based exercises. The essential principles of map use and design, and spatial analysis are also included in this course. Fundamental desktop computer skills assumed. IAI S4 905

HST 111 3

Description: Survey of the American experience through the pre-revolutionary period, the expansion westward and the Civil War. Special stress is placed upon the social, economic, cultural, political and constitutional development of the United States. IAI S2 900

HST 112 3

Description: Surveys the end of Reconstruction to the present, with primary stress on political and economic development. Also includes social, intellectual, and cultural phases, expanded role of government in national affairs and the participation of the United States in international relations. IAI S2 901

HST 121 + 3

Description: Surveys the political and constitutional history of the principal Latin American nations. The course will cover movements leading to independence and social and economic events which are pertinent to relationships with the United States. IAI S2 920N

HST 141 4

Description: Stresses political, social, cultural, economic, and technological developments from prehistoric times and concludes with the last manifestation of essentially medieval ideology,i.e., the Protestant Reformation. IAI S2 902

HST 142 4

Description: Continues HST 141. Commences with the emergence of modern times, i.e., the development of royal absolutism and the beginnings of the modern nation state and concludes with the 20th century and the modern world. IAI S2 903

HST 212 3

Description: Provides students with a comprehensive analysis of the critical period 1945 to the present in American history. Incorporates politics and culture of the Cold War, the revival of liberalism, the Civil Rights movement, the rise of the New Left in the 60s, the Vietnam War, the counterculture, Watergate, the personalization of political activism in the 70s, the women’s movement, the resurgence of conservatism, the Reagan presidency, the Bush era, the Clinton years, return of the Republicans, 9/11, war in the Middle East, the economic downturn, Obama 2008, and the 2012 election. Emphasizes social history and cultural trends as well as political and economic history.

HST 231 + 3

Description: Surveys the Ancient Near East and Middle East from its origins in Ancient Summer up to 1453. Emphasis will be placed on social, political, economic, religious and military institutions. The process of change and broad continuities will be examined in relationship to the historical evolution and growth of the region. IAI S2 920N

HST 232 + 3

Description: Surveys the history of the Middle East from 1453 to the present. Emphasis is placed on social, political, economic, religious, and military institutions that shape the region. The establishment of colonial rule is highlighted along with the struggle for independence, modernization and development. IAI S2 920N

HST 241 + 3

Description: Surveys the history of China from prehistory to the end of the Ming Dynasty. Major emphasis is placed on the evolution and growth of the Imperial system and forces that shaped its continuation and growth. IAI S2 920N

HST 242 + 3

Description: Surveys the history of China from 1644, the Ching Dynasty, to the present. The content will stress the evolution of China from a period of strength and unity to one of disunity and change during the revolutionary times of 1911-1949. Special emphasis will be placed on the establishment of the Communist government in 1949 to the present. Economic modernization, role of foreigners and cultural advancements will also be highlighted. IAI S2 920N

HST 243 + 3

Description: Studies history of East Asia since 1800. The traditional cultures of China and Japan, the Western impact and the Asian response will be covered. IAI S2 920N

HST 245 + 3

Description: Surveys the history of the world from 1945 to the present with major emphasis on historical issues and events that have global impact. IAI S2 913N

PSC 101 3

Description: Focuses on political involvement, elections, campaigns, interest groups, Congress, courts, the presidency, and the constitution. Discusses how our government runs, as well as current political controversies. Utilizes political figures as guest speakers and offers opportunities for political participation, especially in election years. IAI S5 900

PSC 220 3

Description: Examines state and local governments including their powers, organization, functions, development, politics and contemporary issues/problems. IAI S5 902

PSC 250 + 3

Description: Explores the politics of selected countries in Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America and/or the Middle East. Examines economic, social and political patterns and problems in different nations. IAI S5 905

PSC 270 + 3

Description: Uses role playing to study how foreign policy is made. Explores human problems such as populations, food and energy on a global dimension. Examines international bodies, including the United Nations, and explores how nations interact. IAI S5 904

PSC 280 + 3

Description: Examines the political systems of selected non-Western countries, including common governmental problems, causes of political instability and revolution and techniques of political analysis. IAI S5 906N

PSY 101 3

Description: Investigates human and animal behavior with emphasis on the scientific nature of contemporary and classic psychological investigation. Emphasizes psychological theories, principles, and research applications. Introduces the divisions of the American Psychological Association. References biological processes, sensation, perception, learning, memory, thinking, emotional life, mental disorders, intelligence, aptitude, personality, development, daily life and everyday problems. IAI S6 900

PSY 216 3

Description: Investigates the psychological development of the child from conception through pubescence. Emphasizes the theories, principles and empirically derived findings of Child Psychology. Explores cultural and/or international contexts as well as normative and non-normative patterns of development. Discusses mortality during childhood. Integrates the various child psychopathologies. IAI S6 903

Prerequisite: PSY 101 or consent of instructor.

PSY 217 3

Description: Investigates the psychological development of humans from late childhood through adolescence and young adulthood. Emphasizes the theories, principles and empirically derived findings of Adolescence Psychology. Explores cultural and/or international contexts as well as normative and non-normative patterns of development. Discusses mortality during adolescence. Integrates the study of adolescent psychopathologies. IAI S6 904

Prerequisite: PSY 101 or consent of instructor.

PSY 218 3

Description: Investigates the biological, physical, social and psychological development of humans from young adulthood to death and through grief and bereavement. Emphasizes theories, principles and empirically derived findings of Adult Psychology. Addresses cultural and/or international contexts as well as normative and non-normative patterns of development. Discusses mortality throughout adulthood and adult psychopathologies. IAI S6 905

Prerequisite: PSY 101 or consent of instructor.

PSY 228 3

Description: Investigates the psychological development of humans from conception to death, through grief and bereavement. Investigates the theories, empirically derived science and principles of developmental researchers and developmental psychologists. Emphasizes cultural and/or international contexts as well as normative and non-normative patterns of development. Discusses mortality throughout the life-span. Integrates developmental psychopathologies. IAI S6 902

Prerequisite: PSY 101 or consent of instructor.

SOC 101 + 3

Description: Analysis and description of the structure and dynamics of human society. Application of scientific methods to the observation and analysis of social norms, groups, inter-group relations, social change, social stratification and institutions. IAI S7 900

SOC 120 + 3

Description: Examines the family as a social institution and as a dynamic interactive system. Topics include courtship, marriage, family systems, parenting and non-traditional forms of the family. IAI S7 902

SOC 205 + 3

Description: Analysis of contemporary social problems. Investigation of theories dealing with conformity and deviance, racial and minority group prejudice, crime and delinquency, personality problems, urbanization and fundamental institutional problems due to social change. IAI S7 901

Prerequisite: SOC 101 with a grade of C or better.

SOC 215 + 3

Description: Introduces the methods used to understand, explain and predict how the thoughts, feelings and actions of individuals are influenced by the thoughts and actions of social groups. Investigates how attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors are influenced by others within society and how society is influenced by the individual. IAI S8 900

Prerequisite: PSY 101 or SOC 101 with a grade of C or better.

SOC 230 + 3

Description: Examines the social processes in society which translate biological differences (sex) between men and women into social and psychological categories or gender roles. Various theories will be considered in an attempt to understand the existence of gender inequality and how the process of socialization influences the proper "place" for men and women in society. Gender roles and power are considered when analyzing the marketplace, politics, marriage and family, or in considering issues such as the feminization of poverty, violence in the home, and male sensitivity. IAI S7 904D

Prerequisite: SOC 101 with a grade of C or better.

SOC 235 + 3

Description: Examines differential power relations between racial and ethnic groups. Analyzes the economic, political, and cultural structures that produce and reproduce these power differences. Focuses on cultural diversity and various dimensions of prejudice and discrimination including an analysis of racial and ethnic inequality and its origins, and conditions under which these forms of inequality are (re)produced. IAI S7 903D

Prerequisite: SOC 101 with a grade of C or better.

Total General Education

No more than two GEG and two HST courses (except HST 105) may be used to fulfill the General Education requirements.

31

Number Course Title Credits

Core Courses

8 courses

A portfolio review is required with an art advisor after the completion of the first two semesters of art course requirements before starting any other art courses. The Art Department strongly recommends that Associate in Fine Arts-Art candidates also take two semesters of ART 100 for its professional career content.

24

Number Course Title Credits
ART 110 3

Description: Introduces students to descriptive and expressive approaches to drawing with black and white media. Line work, shading, perspective and experimental techniques are practiced. Students learn to accurately depict everyday objects and surroundings, and to develop an awareness of drawing as a creative process. IAI ART 904

ART 111 3

Description: Builds on the content of ART 110 (Drawing I) with applications beyond observation-based approaches. Emphasizes intent, idea development and use of colored media. IAI ART 905

Prerequisite: ART 110 (Drawing I) with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor.

ART 121 3

Description: Introduces students to skills fundamental to two-dimensional visual organization. Explores elements such as line, shape and color, and principles such as unity, balance and variation. Provides a foundation for all areas of art and design. IAI ART 907

ART 122 3

Description: Introduces students to skills fundamental to three-dimensional visual organization. Explores elements such as form, space, and process and principles such as unity, balance and variation. Provides a foundation for all areas of three-dimensional art and design. IAI ART 908

Prerequisite: ART 121 (Design I) with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor.

ART 130 3

Description: Follows the historical development of the visual arts produced by Western civilizations, focusing on major artistic styles, works of art and monuments. Works are examined as expressions of the ideas, beliefs and practices of artists, cultures and societies. Covers the history of art from pre-history to the medieval age. IAI F2 901

ART 131 3

Description: Follows the historical development of the visual arts produced by Western civilizations, focusing on major artistic styles, works of art and monuments. Works are examined as expressions of the ideas, beliefs and practices of artists, cultures and societies. Covers the history of art from the medieval age to the end of the eighteenth century. IAI F2 902

ART 132 3

Description: Follows the historical development of the visual arts produced by Western civilizations, focusing on major artistic styles, works of art and monuments. Works are examined as expressions of the ideas, beliefs and practices of artists, cultures and societies. Covers the history of art from the nineteenth-century to the present time. IAI F2 902

ART 133 3

Description: Follows the historical development of the visual arts produced by non-western civilizations, focusing on major artistic styles, works of art and monuments. Works are examined as expressions of the ideas, beliefs and practices of artists, cultures and societies. Covers the history of art of Africa, China, India, Japan, Middle East, Oceania, and the Americas. IAI F2 903N

ART 225 3

Description: Introduces students to descriptive and expressive approaches to drawing the human figure with an emphasis on anatomy, proportion, contour, gesture and volume. These concepts and techniques are practiced primarily through direct observation of live, nude models using black and white media. May be repeated up to six credit hours. IAI ART 906

Prerequisite: ART 111 with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor.

Media Specific Courses

9

Number Course Title Credits
ART 150 3

Description: Presents a digital-based multimedia approach to making art. Computer hardware, software, mobile devices and web-based applications are employed to capture, manufacture and network images and ideas.

ART 206 3

Description: Introduces printmaking techniques such as lithography, relief, intaglio, and screen-printing. Fosters the development of studio practices and encourages critical awareness. Presents historical and contemporary approaches to the medium. May be repeated up to six hours of credit.

Prerequisite: ART 110 or ART 121 with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor.

ART 250 3

Description: Employs digital technology as a medium for producing works of photographic art. Basic techniques and processes for using a digital still camera, image editing software and archival print technology are used to investigate straight photography as well as highly manipulated images. May be repeated for up to six hours of credit. (Formerly ART 151)

ART 261 3

Description: Introduces painting techniques and media, fosters the development of studio practices, and encourages critical awareness. Presents historical and contemporary approaches to the medium. May be repeated up to six hours of credit.

Prerequisite: ART 110 or ART 121 with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor.

ART 291 3

Description: Introduces hand-building and wheel-throwing techniques, as well as glazing and firing processes. Fosters the development of studio practices and encourages critical awareness. Presents historical and contemporary approaches to the medium. May be repeated up to six hours of credit.

ART 296 3

Description: Introduces sculpture techniques, three-dimensional forms and media. Fosters the development of studio practices and encourages critical awareness. Presents historical and contemporary approaches to the medium. May be repeated up to six hours of credit.

Prerequisite: ART 110 or ART 121 with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor.

World Cultures and Diversity Requirement

One 3-credit hour course is required. Courses that fulfill this requirement may also be used to fulfill requirements in the General Education category.

Number Course Title Credits
Select one course marked with a + from the above Groups.

Total Hours Required:

64

Number Course Title Credits

Related programs

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Next steps

For more information about this program, contact Admission Outreach at 847.925.6700, or submit a request information form. You can also apply online.