Teach English to speakers of other languages

Program facts  Liberal Arts icon


  • Credit hours: 16
  • Stackable to degree: No
  • Potential job outcomes: ESL instructor

Develop the skills and knowledge needed to teach English to speakers of other languages (TESOL) with this 16-credit-hour certificate program. As a TESOL teacher, you can help immigrants learn English, work with people of different cultures in a study abroad program, or travel to other countries to teach English. The program will prepare you for work in both domestic and international contexts.

Coursework focuses on theoretical linguistics, language and culture, English as a second language (ESL) teaching methods, language classroom observations and electives in other areas such as humanities, education, anthropology, psychology, philosophy and literature.

Certificate program requirements

This 16 credit-hour certificate provides students with the skills and knowledge necessary to teach English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in both domestic and international contexts. This certificate provides course work and hands-on experience in theoretical Linguistics, language and culture, English as a Second Language teaching methods, language classroom observations and (depending on students' choices of elective courses)in other areas such as humanities, education, anthropology, psychology, philosophy, and literature.

Admission Requirements:

Students must be eligible for college-level credit courses in order to pursue the TESOL certificate. (If needed, remediation for students will be provided by Harper's Academic Support Services and the Writing Center.) Because the certificate is most often complementary to a college degree, those students who have completed a degree or are pursuing an Associate's degree would be most successful.

Required:

A grade of C or better is required in all LNG courses for all students.

Number Course Title Credits
LNG 105 3

Description: Explores language--its origins, properties, use, structure, and meaning. Studies sound systems, word-information systems, syntactic systems, and derivation of meaning from spoken and written forms. Includes first and second language acquisition and properties of visual languages.

LNG 205 3

Description: Explores the relationship between language and culture. Includes the language socialization of children, gender differences in language, standard varieties and dialects of language, and the effect of language on thought. Examines the nature of language in power relationships.

LNG 220 3

Description: Introduces the teaching of English to speakers of other languages. Intended for those who contemplate a career working with non-native speakers of English. Through a program of lectures, readings, discussions, observations and practical teaching exercises, students will explore the educational contexts in which English is taught and learned. In addition, the course will offer practical techniques for teaching and assessing the skill areas of listening and speaking, reading, writing, and grammar. The foundation of the methods explored will be based on theories in applied linguistics.

LNG 299 1

Description: Provides students with TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) classroom experience including critical observations of ESL classes and detailed activity planning/lesson development. In addition, scaffolded teaching experiences will offer students the opportunity to become familiar with the multiple steps of the language teaching process and the overall requirements of being a TESOL professional. Throughout the practicum, students will reflect on their own effectiveness as ESL teachers and present ways to improve the quality of their instruction.

Education electives:

A grade of C or better is required in all ECE and EDU courses for all students.

Choose 1 or 2 courses (3 or 6 credit hours) from the following:

Number Course Title Credits
ECE 101 3

Description: Provides an overview of early childhood care and education, including the basic values, structure, organization and programming. Examination of the student’s personal qualities in relationship to expectations of the field. Directed observation in a variety of programs and settings. Fifteen (15) hours of observation required. (NOTE: The program’s health requirements must be completed prior to observation.)

EDU 201 3

Description: Provides an introduction to teaching as a profession in the American education system. Offers a variety of perspectives on education including historical, philosophical, social, legal, and ethical issues in a diverse society. Includes organizational structure and school governance. There is a mandatory 15 hour clinical component in this course; therefore, the student must pass a criminal background check for successful completion of this course.

EDU 220 3

Description: Provides an introduction to diversity issues in schools and society today. Examines how schooling is shaped by the social contexts in which it occurs, particularly in multicultural and global contexts. Includes examination of both social and global perspectives.

Other electives:

A grade of C or better is required in all ECE and EDU courses for all students.

Choose 1 course from the list of courses below. If 2 education courses (6 credit hours) were chosen from Education electives, then no credits are required from this category (0 or 3 credit hours).

Number Course Title Credits
ANT 101 3

Description: Addresses such central questions as “What does it mean to be human?” and “How did we get to be the way we are?” Among the topics to be examined will be human, physical, and cultural evolution; the origin of culture; language; religion; kinship; economics; and the impact of contemporary life on the world’s populations. IAI S1 900N

ANT 202 3

Description: Describes and analyzes how people throughout the world define and resolve the problems of life that are found everywhere. Some of the specific topics studied will be religion, social structure, law, “the unknown,” economics and the formation of behavior within particular groups. IAI S1 901N

ECE 102 3

Description: Provides a study of human development from conception through adolescence. Includes research methods and developmental theories. Address all major areas of development (physical, social, emotional and cognitive, language, and aesthetic) and the interaction among these areas. Also examines current research and major developmental theoretical points of view, including those of Piaget, Erikson, Vygotsky, Skinner, Gardner and others. Explores child development in the context of gender, family, culture, socio-economics, race, ethnicity, religion, and society. Emphasis is on the implication for early childhood professional practice. IAI ECE 912

ECE 209 3

Description: Provides an in-depth knowledge and understanding of language development, the stages involved, the role that adults play, and the relationship of language to other aspects of development. Introduces the student to a wide variety of language activities appropriate for young children and develops skills in preparing, presenting and evaluating language activities.

Prerequisite: ECE 115.

EDU 202 3

Description: Provides an in-depth study of classroom practices in the subject and age category that each student is training to teach. Students will complete the clinical component of this course by observing classrooms in their area of interest and will attend a seminar once weekly to discuss their experience; therefore, the student must pass a criminal background check for successful completion of this course.

EDU 211 3

Description: Examines psychological principles underlying educational practice. Theories concerning cognitive and psychological development, human learning, and motivation are studied with emphasis on application for instruction, including assessment. Emphasis will also be placed on learner-centered instruction and diversity. There is a clinical component in this course, therefore; the student must pass a criminal background check for successful completion of this course.

Prerequisite: PSY 101 or consent of instructor.

EDU 219 3

Description: Presents the historical, philosophical and legal foundations of special education as well as an overview of the diverse characteristics of individuals with exceptional cognitive, physical, social and emotional needs, including, but not limited to, children identified as learning disabled. Covers identification, intervention strategies, cross-categorical methods of instruction and programs to meet their needs, including, but not limited to, assistive technologies, Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS), behavioral interventions, and Universal Design. Studies applicable state and federal laws and requirements, including Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), American with Disabilities Act (ADA), Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP), Individual Education Plan (IEP), Response to Intervention (RTI) and inclusive programming. This course addresses the coursework identified in the Illinois Administrative Code 25, Section 25:25 for professional educator licensure. There is a mandatory fifteen (15) hour clinical component in this course; therefore, the student must pass a criminal background check for successful completion of this course. IAI ECE 913

EDU 230 3

Description: Examines the foundations of effective practices in supporting student progress toward both fluent and strategic reading and writing. Provides an introduction to the theory and practices of language arts education for students who are interested in becoming teachers. Focuses on construction of meaning from print, the relationship between reading and writing, and the principles of classroom assessment. Provides an introduction to the Illinois Learning Standards for English Language Arts.

EDU 250 3

Description: Introduces educators to the knowledge and skills required to demonstrate their proficiency in the current technology standards. The course focuses on both knowledge and performance, and includes hands-on technology activities.

Prerequisite: Keyboarding, basic skill word processing, spreadsheet, and database programs, or consent of instructor.

HST 243 3

Description: Studies history of East Asia since 1800. The traditional cultures of China and Japan, the Western impact and the Asian response will be covered. IAI S2 920N

HUM 105 3

Description: Introduces students to a selection of formative historical and contemporary texts in a variety of disciplines, including philosophy, the social sciences, literature, gender/multicultural studies and the history of science.(Also listed as HST 105. Credit will be given for either HUM 105 or HST 105, but not both.) IAI H9 900

HUM 106 3

Description: Examines the arts of Asian cultures from ancient times to the present. Studies examples of the visual arts, music, dance, literature, world views, and religious traditions from selected civilizations in Asia, south of Russia, excluding the countries of the Middle East. IAI HF 904N

HUM 107 3

Description: Examines the arts of African cultures from ancient times to the present. Studies examples of the visual arts, music, dance, literature, world views, and religious traditions from selected civilizations in North Africa, the Sahel, South Africa, Central and East Africa, and West Africa, excluding countries associated with the Middle East. IAI HF 904N

HUM 115 3

Description: Students travel with faculty to international or regional locations which may vary from year to year to study the humanities. May emphasize the literature, language, philosophy, or humane arts of the locale visited. Presentation by onsite individualized study, lectures, field trips. Classes held on campus prior to and following the off-campus learning experience. Travel expenses are paid for by the student. One Credit: Students must attend all classes and field trips, submit a daily log covering one week of travel and write a personal essay of at least five typewritten pages. Two Credits: Students must attend all classes and field trips, submit a log covering one-two weeks of travel and write a research paper of at least eight typewritten pages, plus bibliography and footnotes. Three Credits: Students must attend all classes and field trips, submit a log covering three weeks of travel and write a research paper of at least 10 typewritten pages, plus bibliography and footnotes. Four Credits: Students must attend all classes and field trips, submit a log covering four weeks of travel and write a research paper of at least 12 typewritten pages, plus bibliography and footnotes.

LIT 208 3

Description: Studies selected works from non-western civilizations, such as Africa, China, India, Japan and the Middle East. Fiction, poetry and drama will be included. IAI H3 908N

LNG 225 3

Description: Provides a comprehensive introduction into the study and application of concepts and theories from Healthcare, Linguistics and Communication. Focuses on practical applications of effective communication strategies across diverse patient populations by dissecting and discussing case studies from different healthcare departments, and by analyzing actual provider-patient interactions to understand how specific language choices contribute to constructing meaning in health communication.

PHI 160 3

Description: Introduces selected philosophical concepts and value systems of several non-Western cultures. Gives attention to the Bhagavad Gita, Vedanta and other Hindu texts, Confucius, the Tao Te Ching and other Chinese classics and key texts from at least two other traditions. IAI H4 903N